Comparative Book Review Dismay

At the beginning of this project, I had prepared to discuss five topics found in both Jacobs’ and Garvin’s books. But after reading four and dropping one for sanity’s sake, I’ve found that there just isn’t enough in common between the two to complete the topic I was most looking forward to- historic preservation. Jacobs, while she did discuss the need for old buildings economically, was about a decade at the front-end of the historic preservation movement in the US; The first federal tax incentives promoting home owners to restore and maintain their home properly was enacted about thirteen years after The Life and Death of Great American Cities was published. Garvin was very thorough and in-depth about how to finance a historic preservation district and was very informative. So, I’ll have to wrap-up without that last piece. Look forward to seeing the final cut, condensed to 3-5 pages, shortly.

Darn you, hasty ambition without thorough preparation!

On a completely awesome note: I have an interview to blog for a global company in twelve hours! Send all the good juju!

Advertisements

About Aascot Holt

Staff News Writer for the Easterner. Urban and Regional Planning Major. Senior. Has fingers in all proverbial pies.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s